Save our beautiful Newborough Forest

More than 15,000 members of the public have signed our petitions asking for Newborough forest to be given the protection it deserves and protected in its entirety for future generations to enjoy. If fully implemented the current 2010-2015 Forest Management Plan could lead to all of the most popular & important for tourism areas being devastated.


Summary of our 'Public Awareness Meeting' held on Sept. 5th 2013.

    The main points raised by the three speakers (Emlyn Parry- Williams local resident; Craig Shuttleworth,
    Red Squirrel Project manager; Ian Miller, coastal marine scientist) and the audience were:

    a. failure by WG/NRW to follow the agree process on the science review
    b. failure by WG/NRW to implement certain parts of the forest management plan, for example lack of under-planting in
        areas of the forest agreed upon, and the failure to complete the Red Squirrel Plan, overdue by over 2 years.
    c. failure by WG/NRW to justify the “pilot” fellings on map 2 for this winter
    d. failure by WG/NRW to consult with local people.  The NLP had not met since 2011
    e. failure by WG/NRW to ensure economic benefits of the forest/beach flowed to the local community. (employment,
        income from the £3 car parking fee, etc)


    The following two resolutions were passed with a large majority.

    First resolution
    “ Natural Resources Wales and the Welsh Government must:
    1. implement the promised independent arbitration on the Newborough forest science review and
    2. publicly justify and consult with the local community on any plans they have for permanent removal of trees in Newborough forest”

    Second resolution
    “ Measures must be taken by Natural Resources Wales and the Welsh Government to ensure that Newborough Forest yields greater economic benefits to the local community”

    The meeting was attended by Albert Owen and Rhun ap Iorwerth.  It was also attended by about 130 people.

 

 

The former Countryside Council for Wales 
(now part of NRW) want to transform ....
 
      THIS                                              TO THIS?

 

 

 

 


Assessment of the current Forest Management Plan


Recent developments :

5-9-2013 Public Awareness Meeting: " NEWBOROUGH FOREST - the FUTURE " held at Eglwys Bach, Newborough, to better inform the public about 'Natural Resources Wales' felling proposals for the Forest.
1-4-2013

From 01 April 2013, 'NATURAL RESOURCES WALES' have taken over the functions currently carried out by the Countryside Council for Wales and Forestry Commission Wales.

29-10-2012

Update giving 'Current Scenario' regarding the proposed felling at Newborough Forest. The Welsh Government is in the process of determining the way forward. Until they have completed their review of all the evidence & arguments, we are all awaiting the outcome ( see - Current Scenario - Sept 2012 )

26-04-2011

Assessment of current Forest Management Plan clearance proposals produced & sent to: Albert Owen MP, Ieuan Wyn Jones AM ( see - Assessment NFMP )

24-02-2011

A letter on behalf of everyone who has signed our petition has been sent to: Albert Owen MP, Ieuan Wyn Jones AM/Deputy 1st Minister, & Gerry Quarrell - Head of Countryside Access and Sponsorship ( see - NFPG Public Opposition )

30-11-2010

Newborough Forest Management Plan 2010-2015 published by FCW ( see - NFMP 2010-15 )

WHY DO WE NEED TO SAVE NEWBOROUGH FOREST?

This is a coastal forest in an area of outstanding natural beauty. The intimate link to tranquil beaches & the sea, and views of Snowdonia mountains & the Lleyn peninsula, combined with a rich diversity of flora & fauna, make it a unique & popular destination for visitors throughout the year. It is a haven in poor and fair weather. It has the second largest raven roost in Europe and is a refuge for the protected native red squirrel.

It is enjoyed by over half a million people every year including:

  • Holiday makers
  • Residents
  • Walkers, bicyclists & horse riders
  • School children for outdoor learning
  • Researchers from Universities
  • Bird watchers and naturalists

It has provided a very desirable location for films: the Demi Moore romantic thriller 'Half Light' and most recently 'Clash of the Titans'.

It brings enormous socio-economic benefits to the area and contributes to the overall tourism industry of the Island, which is estimated to be worth £100 million.

Threat of Climate change makes it important to:

  • Save our Forests, more so on Anglesey, which has especially low woodland cover
  • Take holidays locally, avoiding long distance or foreign travel

The Welsh Assembly Government, which owns Newborough Forest, stresses in its plans to transform to a low carbon future, the retaining of carbon in forests and soils.

see also Red Squirrels Trust Wales
( The first reintroduction of Red Squirrels took
place in Newborough forest during 2004-2007.)

WHY IS NEWBOROUGH FOREST UNDER THREAT?

The former Countryside Council for Wales (CCW is now part of NATURAL RESOURCES WALES) believes that the forest is undermining the conservation status of the adjoining dunes that are protected under the EU Habitat Directive. The CCW were recommending clear felling of 60 acres of the forest in the autumn of 2009 but through protests by the general public and a lot of hard work by the Newborough Forest Protection Group, this felling has since been put on hold. This was to be followed by a further removal of some 600 acres, i.e. 40% of the forest, over the next few years. This would leave the remnant forest at least half a kilometer from the beach and mean eventual felling of over 100,000 trees.

This belief is not shared by all. The forest ecosystem has established itself over the last 60 years and is now an important amenity asset for all. CCW's assessment of the status of the dunes is being challenged by other scientists. Greater transparency from CCW is being demanded by the community. EU Habitats Directive requires that social, economic and cultural benefits to the local and wider community are taken into account when planning conservation measures.
For more information see
More...